Tag Archives: .XXX

Porn sites set to go .XXX

CNN is reporting on the release today of .xxx.  Just remember, you are judged by the company you keep so in buying a .xxx domain name it could limit you in your ability to do business with certain companies who have begun to put a ban on doing any sort of business with anyone who owns a .xxx domain name.

CNN – It’s either a new, safer era for adult content on the Web or the first step in creating a digital porn ghetto, depending upon who you ask.

On Tuesday at 11 a.m. ET, more than 100,000 websites are expected to go live with the new .xxx domain.

The suffix was approved as a “top-level domain” address last year by ICANN, the international not-for-profit that coordinates Web addresses. The idea, they say, is to more safely organize content that has become, like it or not, common on the Web.

“The Internet is home to a wealth of content, suitable for a wide range of ages and values,” reads a statement, which is responsible for handing out the new domain names. “The adult entertainment industry has, and always will, account for a large amount of this content and while it is enjoyed by some, it is not suitable, or of interest, to all Internet users.

“Regardless of your views on adult content, it’s here to stay, so let’s be adult about it.”

The group says that creating the suffix will act much like .gov, .edu or .org, giving Web users a heads-up about what sort of site they are visiting based on its Web address alone.

In theory, that would help keep people from stumbling into porn by accident and make it easier for parents to keep their children away from the sites. It also would let users who want to view adult content know that they’re visiting a safe, legitimate and legal site.

Porn, or the promise of porn, is frequently used online in suggestive links that mask viruses, phishing attempts and other harmful malware.

By applying for a .xxx site, webmasters, adult performers, studios and others become part of a “sponsored community,” agreeing to operate legally and within agreed-upon business standards. Each .xxx site will be scanned daily with McAfee protection tools, which ICM says will help make them among the Web’s safest destinations.

But as you might expect, not everyone is pleased with the move.

Some religious organizations have argued against the new .xxx names, saying that creating them amounts to an endorsement of porn.

“The establishment of a .xxx domain would increase, not decrease, the spread of pornography on the Internet, causing even more harm to children, families and communities,” said Patrick Trueman, CEO of Morality in Media and former chief of the U.S. Department of Justice Child Exploitation and Obscenity Section, when ICANN was voting on the plan.

The new .xxx sites will be tagged in a way that will make it easy for parents, employers or others to block them on their networks. Parents can block adult sites via parental-controls settings on most computers’ control panels or by installing parental-control software.

To protect their reputations against porn purveyors who might seek to capitalize on their name, some universities and businesses have bought .xxx domain names that correspond with their .edu or .com addresses. For example, Penn State in September paid $200 each for four .xxx domains: Penn State, PSU, Nittany Lions and The Pennsylvania State University, according to the university’s student newspaper.

The proliferation of .xxx addresses doesn’t mean porn will disappear from .com sites. Adult sites that buy a .xxx domain are free to keep their .com or other current URL as well.

Those who oppose the .xxx domains on moral or religious grounds are being joined by critics from the opposite end of the spectrum.

Some in the porn industry fear that creating the opt-in domain could just be a first step toward making it mandatory. Then, they say, it would make it all too easy for a government somewhere to censor adult content by simply blocking access to all .xxx sites.

Playboy had been leading the charge against the new branding.

Manwin, the Luxembourg-based company that runs Playboy.com and other adult sites, has filed suit in California to stop the implementation of .xxx and said last week that it won’t do business with or allow its content to be used on any sites using the suffix.

“We oppose the .XXX domain and all it stands for,” said Fabian Thylmann, managing partner of Manwin, in a news release. “It is my opinion that .XXX domain is an anticompetitive business practice that works a disservice to all companies that do business on the Internet.”

But not all in the industry are lined up against it.

“We believe the future of adult entertainment online is in the .xxx top level domain,” said Adam Osborn, head of digital at Paul Raymond Publications. “We see a huge benefit in the adult community having an online space dedicated to our content.”

The cost of registering a .xxx domain name can vary dramatically, from a few hundred dollars to simply keep someone else from using an address to much more for sites that may direct hundreds of URLs to the same content.

ICANN has established rules to prevent the early-Internet phenomenon of “cybersquatting,” when someone pays the fee and grabs a name apparently associated with someone else. For example, WhiteHouse.com was, for years, a porn site. (Like most U.S. agencies, the real White House uses .gov.)

The ICM has set up an arbitration system to resolve complaints when someone claims an address applicant has improperly taken a URL that should be theirs.

Manwin Bans ALL .XXX Associations

Manwin, who I think we all will agree now owns a controlling share of the actual internet, or at least the adult portion has made a very interesting decision today.  Effective immediately they will not only refuse to do any sort of business themselves in terms of buying .xxx domain names, they will also not do any business with anyone who does.  This includes buying ad space, selling ad space, buying content, selling content, affiliates and so on.

So anyone who owns a .xxx will flat out find themselves not able to do any sort of business at all with any Manwin owned or run websites which includes Wicked, Twistys, Brazzers and well quite honestly far more than I could ever count.  So before you rush to buy your own .xxx you might want to keep that in mind.

Something tells me that Manwin won’t be the only company making this decision, especially when it comes to their affiliate program.

LUXEMBOURG—Manwin issued a statement Friday announcing that in addition to the antitrust lawsuit it filed Nov. 16 against ICM Registry and ICANN over the approval of the .xxx TLD, it also “has determined to cease any and all internet liaisons with the .xxx Top Level Domain.”

In addition, the announcement states that as of today, Friday, Dec. 2, Manwin has banned all activities between its brands and internet sites registered with a .xxx TLD.

“We oppose the .xxx domain and all it stands for,” said Fabian Thylmann, Managing Partner of Manwin. “It is my opinion that the .xxx domain is an anti-competitive business practice that works a disservice to all companies that do business on the internet.

“The lawsuit was just the beginning,” added Thylmann. “Through this ban, we hope to make a strong statement against the .XXX domain.”

Manwin said it will no longer permit content from or advertising for .xxx websites on its tube sites. In addition, it will not permit its content to be used or advertised on .xxx websites. This will prevent ICM or .xxx from exploiting the 60 million daily visitors to Manwin’s network sites, it said.

By permanently blocking the .XXX domain, Manwin also said it hopes to send a clear message that it does not support ICM or .XXX.

The down and dirty truth about the dot xxx scam

Take all the PR hype out of the mix and just read this one story and you’ll see exactly why so many people hate those .xxx people and how they are willing to MAYBE auction of YOUR trademarked name at a future date for a premium price.  We’ve said all along it’s a scam and now here is just one more bit of proof.  [source]
Before I start my rant feel free to tell me I should never have bothered with .xxx – I know now that is just what I should have done…Having been completely taken in by the registry’s sales pitch and in the hope of securing ‘my’ domains, I went ahead and followed their procedures… FOOL!

I am aware how the majority of you feel about this process and so won’t expect any sympathy, I just want to document this in case anyone else is even considering buying (or trying to buy) theirs.

I ‘pre-reserved’ – now this is being called ‘expressed an interest in’- ‘my’.xxx domain. I joined the ‘sponsored adult community’ – yes I know… MUG!

I have owned and operated janeyweb.com since 2000. I also own a large suite of top level domains (.coms and .co.uks as we are UK based) most of which contain janeyweb or janey in them.

My company trades as Janey Web Productions Ltd. My stage name is Janey Web.

Our registrar secured one .xxx domain with no problem – www.janeysweb.xxx – this in fact is a name we did not oringinally ‘express an interest’ in, we just decided to get it as we use the .com as a pay site.

We were then told by the registrar that janeyweb.xxx AND the second domain we were ‘interested in’ were blocked so they couldn’t buy them for us.

ICM confirmed that these domains were on their “Premium List”.

This means that they are not available in Sunrise A even though I own the top level domains. They MAY be up for auction in November (but they MAY NOT), or we can wait for Landrush in December if someone else didn’t already get them or if the registry actually decide to release them at all!

I asked the registrar to refund the domain we have secured as I do not want to do business with ICM any longer – in fact they have stopped corresponding with me despite never once answering all of my questions, including whether someone else had ‘expressed an interest’ in the domains – this I understood would be the only reason I wouldn’t get them straight away under sunrise A.

The registrar says they cannot refund the registration fee according to their T&Cs, but as we are a long term customer they’ll part refund it as a goodwill gesture…

So I am out of pocket, left with a domain we don’t want and without the ones that I did want – sorry ‘expressed an interest in’ – YEP, SUCKER!

Anybody else been screwed…?

Thanks all.

XBIZ Pimps Out More XXX Loving

A few people have asked if I have any recent news about .XXX and really I don’t have anything new for you other than the fact that XBIZ continues to push them and further hurt their credibility and further insuring that no matter what major changes may come at AVN, their award show will always be the superior one, just quite simply because XBIZ continues to publicly associate itself with enemies of the industry.  Hey … anything for a quick buck, right? ^^

I think really Sara Jay says it best when she tweeted today ….

SaraJayXXX : Just sat thru an .xxx seminar today @xbiz eu ..was a pathetic attempt 2 sell us some unnecessary bs & segregate us from the rest of internet

Derek Hay Whores Himself Out in Support of .XXX

In the past we know Derek Hay / Ben English will pimp out anything that will pay him a buck but damn this is even a new low for him.

“And, according to PR guy Brian Gross, LA Models is bringing the “Biggest Names in Adult” to EXXXOTICA Miami, to endorse .XXX domains.  

Their website will automatically switch from www.ladirectmodels.com to www.ladirectmodels.xxx as soon as Derek Hay’s paperwork goes through.

On hand to celebrate this historic occasion will be Kagney Linn Karter, Lexi Belle, Alexis Texas, Courtney Cummz, Michelle “Bombshell” McGee, Gracie Glam, Daisy Marie, Breanne Benson, Sarah Vandella, Brandy Talore, Kirsten Price, Ann Marie Rios, Allie Haze, Tasha Reign, Tory Lane, Melanie Rios, Joslyn James, Lexi Swallow, Eden Adams, Capri Anderson, Aleksa Nicole, Jenna Presley, Harmony Rose, and Brooklyn Lee [remember her from that Reality Kings ass movie shot in public?]”

Source: Adult Cyber Mart

Is there nothing this piece of shit won’t put his names on and whore his talent out to support for a quick buck?

This is a new low, even for him.

 

India set to block .xxx

In what is probably a shock to nobody, India it seems will be the first of what will no doubt be many Countries to block an entire top-level domain name.  It was actually one of the arguments against approving .xxx and is now holding to be true with India primed and ready to block access to any and all domains that end in .xxx in their country.   Not to overstate the obvious here but what good is a domain name if nobody can visit it?  I guess we can put this in the I TOLD YOU SO file?

FULL STORY FROM HERE

India is set to block the Internet’s newly-formed, highly controversial cyber “red-light district” after a global agency governing the web approved .xxx suffix for pornographic websites last week, a senior government official said.

A few days ago, the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) approved the .xxx suffix for pornography websites. In response, a senior official at the ministry of IT stated that “India, along with many other countries from the Middle East and Indonesia, opposed the grant of the domain in the first place, and we would proceed to block the whole domain, as it goes against the IT Act and Indian laws.”

Under the Indian Penal Code, while distribution of adult content is illegal, watching such content is still permitted. Vivek Sood, cyber lawyer and author of ‘The Fundamental Right to the Internet’ sees the move ineffective because the same content can be hosted in other domains like .com and .in. Although other websites of the same nature continue to provide access under different domains, the ministry vows to be keen in reviewing those sites on a case to case basis. On the other hand, Internet activists and cyber law experts believe that the new suffix in fact would enable better policing by parents and employers.

The new top-level domain has already registered about 250,000 domains in anticipation, even before the approval came this month. The domain names are likely to be available in Q2 of 2011.